Misleading charge for domain transfer!


#1

Never, in the whole process, did CloudFlare tell me the charges were USD! This is so misleading!

I don’t want to transfer if I’m going to end up paying more than I was paying before!


#3

I see the $ sign next to the prices. I am not familiar with any other interpretation for that sign, but the USD. It’s true that some other countries chose to take the name “Dollar” into their currency (with a different value), but they were aware that they’re confusing people, so they list their prices as CAD (Canada), AUD (Australia), and so forth.

I think that if someone sees the $ sign on a website that does not obviously directs itself to local users of a specific country (e.g. a fictional “Telecom Australia” or “Canada Car Wash”), the dollar type assumed should be a US one.


#4

Hi shimi,

You are probably someone living in US so you don’t really understand the issue that I went through here, because you never face this problem.

We, in Canada, use Amazon, and Namesilo, and NameCheap, and countless other websites that show currencies as well and by default, it is always assumed that it is the local currency.

I think that if someone sees the $ sign on a website that does not obviously directs itself to local users of a specific country (e.g. a fictional “Telecom Australia” or “Canada Car Wash”), the dollar type assumed should be a US one.

That’s something that you think. I don’t think that’s what everybody else thinks, especially people living in other countries that also use the $ sign.


#5

At first, I wanted to write that this is well understood to me that $ in a global site that doesn’t say which $ is it, DESPITE the fact that I’m not living in the US. I am very aware of the tendency of some Americans to believe that they’re the center of the world (the most common example is that even in companies that do international business, they still write their phone numbers without a +1 prefix, as if we should assume that the country is the US from a (323) 345-6567 formatted phone), but I thought I’ll let you get it wrong, and then correct you, to prove the point.

So, I don’t live in the US. I have never been there. If I see the $ sign on a non .au/.ca site, I assume USD. The most confusing ones, in my opinion, are sites that sell internationally from AU/CA, do not identify themselves as such unless you dig at the “contact us” section, and use $ to show currency when they mean AUD/CAD. Maybe they believe they’re the center of the world like Americans do for phone numbers… who knows.

I agree that Cloudflare should use “USD” to say that the prices are USD, even though NOTHING on their site should make you assume that they’re Canadians or Australians. However, if they didn’t, the assumption that users should take is USD unless there’s an obvious demonstration of otherwise. It is a majority thing. Most people in the world do think of $ as USD, because that’s simply the most long-standing economy to use this in the name of the currency, since 1792 (per https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dollar#Economies_that_use_a_dollar). For that reason, most of the world assumes $ = USD. And if you don’t know, and you go to somewhere international, you should assume $ = USD, even if you’re from Australia or Canada.

This is of course my opinion, as a citizen of the world. You can choose to assume something else, but I think you’ll simply be wrong 99.99999% of the times…