hCaptcha is not accessible

hCaptcha is not simply not accessible. hCaptcha requires visually impaired users to give personal information and allow third-party tracking cookies to be placed on their machine. Users of the captcha challenge are not subject to this. The hCaptcha accessibility alternative does not work with privacy-protecting browser configurations that the normal hCaptcha works fine with. This is not reasonable. Do you feel that visually impaired users are not entitled to the same privacy online as everyone else? If you required all users to register an hCaptcha account and maintain a third-party cookie just to access websites it would be unacceptable. Why is it acceptable to require that of users unable to identify images?

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I’m guessing this is to verify you passed the CAPTCHA, though I’m not happy about that.

What personal information are they asking for?

I’m aware that “accessible” means providing the same experience for everybody, and this does not sound like that’s the case.

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I think that hCaptcha had to take some measurements to prevent accessibility measures from being used against their security product (this is why they do not offer audio captcha, for example).

It is a complicated topic to cover; Google did it well by giving a trust factor to people logged in to Gmail and thus saving some clicks/challenges.
They also have an audio challenge that I believe is not that bad; they are forced to add noise and some awkward sounds to prevent ML attacks.

All being said, hCaptcha excuse of saying that audio captcha is not on their platform due to ML attacks is piss poor considering that none of their other challenges add resilience against ML attacks.

Note that I’m not saying that Google’s solution is perfect, however, they have solutions with far less friction.

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