Google to switch to HTTPS as default URL scheme 2

Scheduled for version 90.0 with the beginning of April.

Christ, soon there’ll be a version number 100.0 :roll_eyes:

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My first toughts were “… Oh Long Johnson …” :sweat_smile:

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Reminds me on Android application development and their “backwards compatibility” :triumph:

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You mean the version number? Double-digit numbers for versions were pretty crazy and now we reach triple-digits. Well :man_shrugging:t2:

As for the move to “https://” itself, I believe they should have done it even earlier, but it still raises the question what they do with sites on HTTP. They do mention fallbacks, but loading a site might take a tad longer because the browser will have to wait for HTTPS to time out.

But overall it’s a move which should be welcomed IMHO and will make - platitude-alert - “the Internet more secure”. Which would of course immediately bring up the Flexible topic and how Cloudflare does the opposite :wink:

Ahh yeah, deprecations :slight_smile:. There was something they introduced with API 29 and immediately deprecated in the same version. Of course I could not find it now.

I still remember a time when the Internet mob complained all about Microsoft, how bad they were, how “sucky” their software was, and how much better Google. 15 years later and we miss the times of Microsoft’s relatively “stable” backward compatibility.

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Straight to the point! Exactly that!

“should” as always

True, it’s interesting “workaround” solution as far as for now :smiley:

It will just make things slower as it will first try 443 and only once that timed out switch to 80. And of course something like the to-HTTPS redirect as we had it so far will be pointless the other way round.

I wounder how much the difference actually is? I did not tested, but yes, the “round-trip” should take some longer time. And, if for example an website is not on HTTP/2, even longer, right?

HTTP 2 shouldn’t make a difference, but if 443 for example does not work it could be several seconds depending on what timeout value is used.

It would be really nice if they did not attempt
to optimise the user experience with a dual-connect Happy Eyeballs type of experience. Let the HTTP experience be poor, and the problem can be quickly and easily fixed.

More of a reason to use Cloudflare, ain’t it :wink:

I get your point, but I’d prefer if they simply stopped supporting unencrypted connections, rather than artificially punishing them.

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Mozilla seems to have made that move already in November, in a slightly different way however

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